Carpenter Imagines his Health & Financial Problems Are Worse Than They Are: Kills Self

Paragraph two reads:   "John Gary Robinson, 60, from Norfolk road, Borras, had stopped taking medication for depression, diabetes and high blood pressure, in the weeks before his death on July 31."

SSRI Stories is of the opinion that one of the adverse reactions to SSRIs & SNRIs is "fear of having a terminal illness".

Some of the cases on SSRI Stories involve people who took their lives and the lives of their family because they mistakenly thought they and their loved ones were terminally ill.  This is especially true during the withdrawal process.

http://www.dailypost.co.uk/news/north-wales-news/2008/12/12/wrexham-joiner-s-fears-had-led-him-to-suicide-55578-22459850/

Wrexham joiner’s fears had led him to suicide

Dec 12 2008 by Carl Butler, Daily Post

A JOINER shot himself, imagining his health and financial problems were worse than they really were.

John Gary Robinson, 60, from Norfolk road, Borras, had stopped taking medication for depression, diabetes and high blood pressure, in the weeks before his death on July 31.

A Flint inquest heard yesterday how his family became worried about him when he failed to come home one night, and police found him the next day in his van, parked and locked on the Redwither Industrial Estate, Wrexham.

After breaking in they found Mr Robinson dead inside with his air rifle at his side. Pathologist Dr Anthony Burdge said his death was due to a gunshot wound to the head.

Mrs Sandra Robinson said her husband John, a father of two, had been in business with his son.

Although he suffered with high blood pressure and diabetes and had been prescribed anti- depressants, she felt he sometimes thought his medical problems were more serious than they were. And although they had some financial concerns she again felt he exaggerated them.

He had used an air rifle to shoot rabbits and pigeons and often kept it in his van.

Acting central and north east coroner John Gittins, recorded a verdict of suicide. He said: “Mr Robinson was a man whose judgement was clouded by illness, but things were nowhere near as bad as he thought.”

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