Drugs linked to Agnes’ murder — (The Chester Chronicle)

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The Chester Chronicle

By Chester Chronicle

14:00, 20 JAN 2005 Updated08:47, 24 JUL 2013

 

A WIDNES woman was under the influence of a cocktail of drugs when she bludgeoned to death frail OAP Agnes Hanrahan.

Denise Davies, 53, claimed she had consumed a combination of drugs including heroin and possibly cocaine, as well as painkillers and anti-depressants, on the night that she allegedly attacked the 71-year-old in her own home.

She and her daughter, Samantha Davies, 18, both of Houghton Street, Widnes, deny the murder of Agnes Hanrahan and charges of perverting the course of justice.

Matthew Lawson, 20, of Somerset Way, Warrington, has also been charged with perverting the course of justice. He has pleaded not guilty.

Mrs Hanrahan’s body was discovered by her daughter who was alerted by a Mealson-Wheels worker who received no response when she knocked at Mrs Hanrahan’s home in Baguley Avenue, Widnes, on December 9, 2003, Chester Crown Court was told.

Robert Leighton-Davies, QC, prosecuting, told the jury at Chester Crown Court that Denise Davies had taken the anti-depressant venlaflaxine, in addition to four other painkillers for arthritis on December 8.

He said that at around 7-8pm she had gone on to take 18 tablets of an anti-depressant amytriptalene, having earlier taken heroin and possibly cocaine.

He said: ‘She claims that around half an hour later she was at the house of Agnes Hanrahan and had a cup of tea and then lost it and attacked her with a heavy object.’

The court heard that Mrs Hanrahan had formerly been a neighbour of Denise and Samantha Davies, but they continued to stay in touch after Mrs Hanrahan moved away. The court was also told that both mother and daughter were crack and heroin addicts.

Expert prosecution witness Dr Ivor Edwards, a consultant for the Community Drugs Team in Widnes, said the amount of drugs Denise Davies had consumed would not have been sufficient to prompt someone to carry out such an attack.

But Professor Alexander Forest, an analytical chemist appearing for the defence, claimed there was a real potential for ‘positive interaction’ between cocaine and amytryptalene which could have counteracted the sedation effect.

Drug dealer David Mackin told the court that he supplied heroin and crack cocaine to the defendants.

‘I used to supply drugs to them. They would ring me and I would go to see them or they would come to see me,’ he said.

Mr Mackin told the court that Denise and Samantha Davies had visited his home wanting to buy drugs and they had a substantial amount of money with them.

He said: ‘Sam had asked if I had any drugs and then pulled out a wedge of money worth around £300. She said she had got it from her dad for her birthday or for Christmas.’

Samantha Davies is alleged to have bought eight bags of heroin and eight bags of cocaine worth around £150, plus an old mobile phone from Mr Mackin.