Fartown man who killed his dad had attacked his wife and mum before — (The Huddersfield Daily Examiner)

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The Huddersfield Daily Examiner

05:00, 24 Nov 2011  Updated 03:37, 12 Jul 2013

By Huddersfield Examiner

A FORMER secondary school teacher jailed for killing his father had previously attacked his mother and his wife.

And it can now be revealed that Jasknwal Rana’s father had worked nights to fund his son’s private education and then tried desperately to steer him away from booze after his life had gone badly off the rails.

Rana was yesterday jailed for three years after a drunken assault at his family home in Huddersfield led to the death of his 75-year-old father Tarsam Singh. He had denied manslaughter but was convicted by a jury.

Bradford Crown Court heard how well-respected Mr Singh had worked nights at a local engineering firm to fund his only son’s private education, but 33-year-old Jasknwal Rana’s life went off the rails after he married a Canadian woman.

Seven months before the fatal attack at the family home in Alder Street, Fartown, Rana had had to leave Canada after assaulting his wife and in November last year he was cautioned for hitting his own mother.

Bradford Crown Court heard how Mr Singh, who had been registrar at his Sikh temple, tried to stop his son’s excessive drinking by visiting local shops and off-licences telling owners not to sell Rana spirits.

But, on the night of his death, his son had been drinking lager and vodka before Mr Singh was assaulted in the kitchen of his home.

The Honorary Recorder of Bradford Judge James Stewart QC suggested tensions in the family were like “a volcano waiting to erupt’’ and they did so on May 6 this year with tragic results.

He said: “The catalyst for your attack appears to have been that you thought your father was going on at you for your drinking, telling you to stop drinking.’’

Rana put his father in a headlock before punching him two or three times in the face, breaking his nose and causing it to bleed heavily.

Although Mr Singh was able to go to a neighbour’s house and get them to contact the police, he later returned to his own property where he collapsed in the driveway.

It was only after his death that it was discovered he was suffering from severe ascemic heart disease and could have died at any time.

Judge Stewart accepted that Rana had not intended to cause his father serious harm and that he would have to live with what happened forever.

He told Rana: “Your actions caused the release of a rush of adrenaline with which the pump in his heart couldn’t cope so that his heart failed and he died shortly afterwards.’’

The court heard extracts from a victim impact statement prepared by one of Rana’s three sisters in which he was said to have made his parent’s life a misery.

Rana’s sister Kamaljit said the family had been totally devastated by the death of Mr Singh and her brother had deprived all of them of a father and grandfather.

Mr Singh’s wife, who suffered a stroke in the past, was now living with one of her daughters in the Midlands and the home where they had lived for more than 40 years was for sale.

Rana’s barrister John Elvidge QC said his client was acutely aware of the fracturing effect on the family of the loss of its father figure.

The court heard that Rana had been prescribed anti-depressants, but he had stopped taking them because his father didn’t approve of them.

Judge Stewart told Rana: “Your family is now fragmented as a result.

“Nothing I can say can bring your father back. Nothing you can do can bring your father back.

This was more than a single blow manslaughter. It was a heavy attack upon a man more than twice your age. I have not the slightest doubt that you didn’t really want to injure your father and bitterly regret it now and will forever.”

Det Chief Insp Lisa Griffin from West Yorkshire Police’s Homicide and Major Enquiry Team said: “This has been a tragic case to investigate as, now that Jasknwal Rana has been sent to prison for the manslaughter of Mr Singh, the family have lost a second of their relatives for three years now.”